Posts Tagged ‘Food’

Rosehip Syrup Recipe

Rosehips are abundant in early Autumn and Rosehip syrup is a great source of Vitamin C and can be used to boost the immune system and prevent coughs and colds – apparently anywhere up to 20 times as much Vitamin C as citrus fruits. This is a simple enough recipe, with few ingredients and just a bit of preparation required.

For the traditionalists, Rosehip syrup is made with Rosa canina – Wild or Dog Rose. The Rosehips are a distinctive red-orange, bullet shape but can be quite tough and difficult to process early in the season, then disintegrating to the touch much later on. You can also use hips from other varieties of Roses, Rosa rugosa with it’s fat, almost Tomato-like hips is a common escape around Glasgow and provides much more juicy flesh to extract. I like to use a mixture for convenience, whilst also ensuring plenty of quality, wild constituents – Roses that have been bred for blooms will not necessarily have the same therapeutic properties as their wild cousins. An important safety point, it is best not to pick from ornamental Roses, both ethically – they belong to someone else – and because they may have been sprayed with chemicals that you would rather not ingest.

 

Rosehip Syrup Recipe

Rosehips  1kg   *   Water     3 litres   *   Sugar       450g

2 Saucepans   *   Jelly Bag / double muslin   *    Clean bottles / Freezable container

 

  • Have 2 litres of water on the boil in a saucepan
  • Chop the Rosehips up as much as you can and add to the pan quickly – if you have a mincer, use this and mince the Rosehips directly in to your pan
  • Bring back to the boil, remove heat and leave for 15 minutes
  • Pour the pulpy liquid through a jelly bag, dripping in to a 2nd saucepan / large bowl
  • Take the pulp from the jelly bag and add back to the original saucepan with 1 litre of water
  • Boil, remove from the heat, leave for 10 minutes, then pass through the jelly bag again
  • Simmer all of the liquid in a clean saucepan until it reduces down to about 1 litre
  • Stir in the sugar to dissolve, bring to the boil for 5 minutes
  • Bottle your syrup in sterilised jars and/or pour in to a freezable container to make scoopable Rosehip syrup / sorbet

Use the Rosehip syrup through the winter to supplement Vitamin C, or as a topping for desserts.

Chop your Rosehips up a fair bit to get the most from the extraction, and get them gently cooking as soon as possible to preserve the Vitamin C. Over-cooking can also reduce the amount of available Vitamin C.

If you are using Rosa canina you may find the small hairs on the hips and seeds slightly irritating – wear gloves if you’re particularly sensitive and don’t squeeze the pulp in the jelly bag as some of the tiniest hairs may come through.

Spring Elderflower Vinegars / Shrubs

The first Scottish Radical Herbal Gathering is in September – tickets on sale in July. We recently got talking about the important entertainments aspect of the Gathering and wanted to make sure there will be some tasty forageables for the non-alcoholic attendees – we have a lot of options for wild alcohol… As I have a lot of Elderflower Recipes of the boozy and non-boozy varieties and, one of my favourites, Elderberry Vinegar, I thought, why not combine the two and look in to some Elderflower Vinegars?

Today, I managed to collect a good stash of Elderflower heads – unexpected bonus of the cooler weather is that I only brought one greenfly in to the flat and its sensitive pre-allotment seedlings on the windowsill. When you’re picking Elderflower heads it should ideally be early on a sunny day, so that you get maximum pollen before the insects get to it. In reality, you can pick later in the day, just give the flowers a good sniff to check they’re fragrant – this can vary a bit from tree to tree as well. A few points on picking, like all foraging, Elderflower picking is best done sustainably and respectfully, leaving plenty behind for the plant and other species’ who rely on it to survive. Respectful foraging also often means securing the main plant with one hand as you pick with the other – petals like Rose  and very ripe berries are probably the main exceptions. You should also try to remove the plant material cleanly and from a growth point to prevent dead material being left on the plant and potentially creating an easy environment for deseases. When I got home, I discovered that getting Elderflowers off of their stalks with a fork is a tad more labour intensive than getting Elderberries – which you can freeze and then they pop off. I recommend a good, long radio programme for when you have a go with these recipes.

I’ve used two recipes – one with sugar from the outset from JamJarShop and another with no sweeteners (yet) from GreatFoodClub They both take 2 to 3 weeks to infuse, after which I’ll strain them and then use the vinegar to make refreshing shrubs, diluted with soda water.I’m sure there’ll be some left for the Gathering in September.

Sugar-Free Recipe

  1. Sterilise a large jar – I used a Kilner which was just under 1L.
  2. I picked 15 elderflower heads for 900ml white wine vinegar.
  3. Pick the flowers and place in the jar, covering with the vinegar.
  4. Seal, and place on a sunny windowsill for 2-3 weeks.
  5. Strain through muslin and decant vinegar into bottles.
  6. Store in a dry, dark cupboard.

Sugary Recipe

Follow the steps above with slightly different ingredients, for a roughly 1L jar, I used:

18 elderflower heads /  450g caster sugar / zest of 1 orange / 650ml apple cider vinegar

 

Autumn Events 2014

Harvest time is pretty busy for herbalists and foragers – if you’d like to come and share some of the Autumn berry bounty, you can find me at the events below or get in touch to book a workshop or forage for your event. Some events are booking only, I’ve an Events page on Facebook or email me whitecat-herbal@hotmail.co.uk to book a space.

VENUE CHANGE: Springburn Drumchapel Foraging Walk: Saturday 20th September 12-4pm

As part of Doors Open Day in Glasgow, I’ll be on the North West Glasgow Art Trail at Springburn Park. The event is from 12-4pm with How to Make Your Own Remedies throughout the afternoon and two Foraging Walks at 12.30 & 2pm. Spaces on the walks are limited so please use the Facebook link or email me to book a space.

Boost Your Immunity Class, Woodland Herbs: Thursday 2nd October 7-9pm   £10 per person

Learn how to boost your immunity using simple herbal remedies and dietary advice. We’ll look at plants for general immune support, colds, ‘flu’ and other infections which tend to pop up in the colder weather. Booking is essential for the class as spaces are limited Facebook or email me to enquire about spaces.

Queen’s Park Foraging Walk: Sunday 12th October 11am-1.30pm

My regular monthly walk on the southside of Glasgow, we’ll meet at the Glad Cafe on Pollokshaws Road at 11am to head to the park and check out what’s growing in high Autumn. Plenty of fruits, berries, hips and haws for Hedgerow Jelly – more details here

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Elderflower Cordial and Delights

I wrote last year about Elderflower Champagne, this year something for the sweet, rather than alcholic, tooth: Elderflower Cordial and Elderflower Turkish Delight (adapted from here, many thanks for the inspiration). Both recipes require an overnight wait, to infuse the Elderflower for the Cordial and to set the Turkish Delights.

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Elderflower Cordial

Elderflower Champagne June 2013   To make 1 litre of cordial, in a large bowl mix:

15 Elderflower heads, freshly picked

Zest of 1 lemon and ½ an orange (keep the juice to add later)

Pour 750ml boiling water over the mix, cover and leave overnight

Strain and discard the flowers and zest

Heat the liquid with 500g sugar and the orange and lemon juice

Simmer for a few minutes then bottle whilst still hot

The cordial keeps for a few weeks in the fridge, or freeze to keep for later in the year

TO USE: Dilute 1:4 with cold, hot or sparkling water

VARIATIONS: Make ice lollies: 1 part cordial to 2 parts water

                                Add to cocktails           *          Flavour desserts

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Elderflower Turkish Delight

This is an easy recipe, which just requires a little patienceCreated with Nokia Smart Cam

In one pan heat 250ml water with 1 tbsp lemon juice and 200g sugar

Bring to the boil and allow to evaporate to a light syrup, stirring occassionally

(not as technical as it sounds – I do this using guess work and finger-crossing)

In a second pan gently heat 250ml water and 50g cornflour

This requires a bit more stirring than the sugar mix as it will thicken quickly

Pour the hot sugar syrup in to the gloopy cornflour and mix well

Simmer gently for one hour – it will make disturbing noises, leave it alone

Flavouring: add 1 tablespoon Elderflower Cordial at the end of the hour, stir in well

Pour the mixture in to a tupperware box and leave to set overnight

Created with Nokia Smart CamCut your Delights and roll in a mixture of icing sugar and cornflour, with twice as much cornflour as icing sugar

Store in an airtight container

The Delights will keep for a few days, re-roll them in the icing sugar mix if they get a bit sticky

VARIATIONS: add 1 tablespoon Rosewater and 5 frozen Raspberries

Pre-flavour your syrup using Elderflower or Rose flavoured sugar

March 2014 Herb Foraging

We had a wonderful walk last Sunday in Queen’s Park, south Glasgow. It was a wee bit overcast and very windy in places, but we did have a gorgeous Cairn Terrier called Poppy to keep us amused. So, after a warming cuppa in the Glad Cafe, we set off towards the park.

Our first find was Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) – great for fevers and especially migraines – there are just a few leaves visible just now and you can still smell the strong, medicinal aroma of parthenolides. One leaf per day – ideally with some bread, the leaf can cause blisters if eaten alone – will prevent migraine by dilating the blood vessels in the head, essential plant medicine. Then, to the Coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara) – hiding their bright yellow flowers without the sun, but still sweet and aromatic in the stem. The flowers come out before the leaves, unusual in plants and leading to folk names like Son before the Father. Coltsfoot is an excellent cough remedy and can be made in to a tea, syrup or tincture, the stems can be candied and sucked for a sore, cough-irritated throat.

Up on the hill, we found the start of the Sorrel (Rumex acetosa) – a sour, lemony tang to the leaf, especially if torn against the grain. Highlanders call this Juicy Leaves and it is used around the world, particularly in former French colonies, for soup and sauces for fish. We also found a good display of Ribwort Plantain (Plantago lanceolata) – another great throat medicine, Plantain’s dual action of tightening and soothing mucous membranes and exposed surfaces makes it a great plaster for cuts (chew your own) and also for sneezes, especially of the allergic type. Maxime managed to spot a small grove of Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) in leaf. The trees are slow to wake up, but you will find some very abundant hedges as strimming promotes early growth, although it does prevent flowering as Hawthorn flowers on 2nd year growth – less of this if you cut the year before. We spotted a couple of Hawthorn berries holding on from the Autumn – these are past medicinal or culinary use, but can still be good food for birds and probably squirrels. Hawthorn leaves are tasty in sandwiches and make a suprisingly substantial snack – their old name Bread and Cheese may refer to the rich texture or mouth-feel, rather than taste.

We stomped around the windy hill, spotting the variegated leaves of Yellow Archangel (Lamium galeobdolon) – a Mint or Deadnettle with pretty yellow flowers which can be used in salads. Beside the flag pole we found a flourishing green medicine chest – Nettle, Garlic Mustard, Ground Elder, Cleavers – all great for Spring Detox juicing, soups and pesto. We also found the Queen’s Park Wild Garlic Patch – probably planted by a keen allotmonteer and just budding with the first pungent flowers.

A little bit wind-worn, we wandered back down the hill towards Locavore, spotting a tub of Chickweed (Stellaria media) in the street. At Locavore we cooked up some Nettle and Wild Garlic pesto and sampled some 4 Thieves’ Vinegar I’d made earlier with Wild Garlic leaves instead of the traditional Garlic cloves. We also tried some very mustardy Lady’s Smock (Cardamine pratensis) – deceptively delicate pale-purple flowers with quite a punch.

A great lunch and time to chat and share ideas for future walks – thanks for coming and for the photos and see you at the end of April.

Elder, Fennel and Violet – Tales from Battlefield Gardens

Medicinal plants have been part of the storytelling tradition for centuries – from fairytales to Shakespeare. Amanda Edmiston of Botanica Fabula has written a wonderful new story about two brothers for the Battlefield Community Gardens, with appearances from 3 medicinal plants – Elder, Fennel and Violet. Amanda’s tale reminds us of the tortoise and the hare, with the tortoise-like brother tending and collecting plants along his journey. The plants then form a part in his proving how the quest ended. You can add your own moral, I like to think if we look after the plants, they’ll look after us.

Elder Tree     Sambucus nigra

The Elder tree gives us two different medicines – from the flowers in Spring and berries in Autumn. The sweet, heady flowers can be used to make cordial or champagne or if you want to have maximum berries later in the year, just pick a few heads of flowers and make an Elderflower sugar. Elderflower tea is perfect for colds, ‘flu’ and allergies – with Nettle and Plantain they make a great hayfever tea, add Eyebright if streaming or irritated eyes are a problem.

Elderberry is full of anti-oxidant vitamins and is a great anti-viral. You can make a syrup for coughs and colds or a culinary vinegar for salad dressings and marinades. You will know that your Elderberries are ready for picking when the purple berries hang heavy from the branches – you may also see pigeons happily munching away at the top of the tree. Elderberry seeds can be slightly irritating to your stomach, so do be careful if you’re eating any of them raw – just try a couple to check you have tasty, ripe berries, then make sure to process the rest well to remove the seeds or dry and use as a tea.

 

Violet    Viola spp.

Sweet, cooling violets make a great syrup for coughs and colds, especially for children. The cooling character is great for fevers and also the emotional heat of anger. For hot, angry skin conditions, Violet tea can be taken, with a Violet cream to soothe and protect.

 

Fennel    Foeniculum vulgare

With a familiar kick of Liquorice-like aniseed flavour,  Fennel is used as gripe water for babies to ease disrupted digestion and by mothers to help milk production.

Fennel Flower

Fennel is a very portable medicinal plant – the tiny flowers and seeds are especially strong and pungent and can be nibbled to ease the stomach or the lungs – aiding clear breathing and good digestion to keep a traveller strong and nourished. If you’ve missed the flowers, the rest of the plant is also edible and medicinal and can be chopped to make a tea.

 

Look out for more Tales of Medicinal Plants as the Battlefield Community Garden develops.

 

 

 

Autumn Recipes: Hedgerow Jelly

September is only just upon us and in Glasgow it feels resolutely autumnal already. A quick walk in the park today turned up plenty of Rowan, ripening Hawthorn and Bramble and some fantastic polypore mushrooms (great cooked with garlic on toast). I also finally found my local Yarrow supply which has been hiding all year and is just perfect to dry right now – fully in flower with great, fluffy-spiked leaves.Autumn FruitsAs it’s a Sunday, it was the ideal time for a trip to the country park and Finlaystone was full of stinky herbal delights – Figwort and Wood Betony were both in acrid abundance. I also added a large haul of windfall apples from a secret location off the Hillington industrial estate – thankfully my kind runner friends keep a look-out for interesting trees whilst they’re pacing the pavements and pointed me in the right direction.

One down side is that the Elderberries are taking their time this year – I managed to snaffle about a dozen berries on my way back from the shops, but the rest have a good couple of weeks before they’re ready. In the meantime, a very vague Autumnal recipe to use now or at least soon…

Hedgerow Jelly

Stuff you find in hedges, in a condiment – it’s important to get plenty of pectin in to set the jelly so make sure to have loads of crab apples, about the same weight as the total of the rest of your hedgerow fruits.

First of all, collect some rosehips, brambles, rowan berries, plums (other recipes says sloes, you are mad to use the rare Glasgow sloes for anything other than gin) and plenty of crab apples.

  •     Chop everything up a bit and put it in a pan with just enough water to cover the fruit
  •     Simmer until it’s a juicy mess
  •     Strain through a jelly bag and leave overnight
  •     Put the juice in a pan and heat
  •     When hot, add sugar (500g for every 600ml of juice), dissolve and keep heating
  •     Boil until it sets – test for this after 10 minutes, then at 5 minute intervals
  •     Pour in to sterilised containers

Eat during the year with meat, cheese and in sandwiches.

Things to consider:

  •    You can use cooking apples instead of crab apples
  •    If you squeeze the jelly bag too much the final result will be cloudy, but there will be more of it.
  •    The easiest way to find the “setting point” is to pour a little bit of the mixture on to a fridge-cold plate or saucer. Then let it cool and push your finger through – if the surface wrinkles, you are at the setting point. If not, keep boiling for another 5 minutes and try again.

I can also heartily recommend the Haw-Sin sauce recipe to use your Hawthorn berries when they ripen.